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dc.contributor.authorClaidière, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorBowler, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBrookes, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorWhiten, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-14T19:47:00Z
dc.date.available2020-07-14T19:47:00Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0099874
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/540
dc.description.abstractConformity is thought to be an important force in human evolution because it has the potential to stabilize cultural homogeneity within groups and cultural diversity between groups. However, the effects of such conformity on cultural and biological evolution will depend much on the particular way in which individuals are influenced by the frequency of alternative behavioral options they witness. In a previous study we found that in a natural situation people displayed a tendency to be ‘linear-conformist’. When visitors to a Zoo exhibit were invited to write or draw answers to questions on cards to win a small prize and we manipulated the proportion of text versus drawings on display, we found a strong and significant effect of the proportion of text displayed on the proportion of text in the answers, a conformist effect that was largely linear with a small non-linear component. However, although this overall effect is important to understand cultural evolution, it might mask a greater diversity of behavioral responses shaped by variables such as age, sex, social environment and attention of the participants. Accordingly we performed a further study explicitly to analyze the effects of these variables, together with the quality of the information participants' responses made available to further visitors. Results again showed a largely linear conformity effect that varied little with the variables analyzed.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0099874
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2014 Claidière et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
dc.subjectZOOS
dc.subjectZOO VISITORS
dc.subjectCULTURE
dc.subjectEVOLUTION
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGY
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.titleFrequency of behavior witnessed and conformity in an everyday social context
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePLOS ONE
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpagee99874
dc.source.endpagee99874
dcterms.dateAccepted2014
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-14T19:47:00Z
html.description.abstractConformity is thought to be an important force in human evolution because it has the potential to stabilize cultural homogeneity within groups and cultural diversity between groups. However, the effects of such conformity on cultural and biological evolution will depend much on the particular way in which individuals are influenced by the frequency of alternative behavioral options they witness. In a previous study we found that in a natural situation people displayed a tendency to be ‘linear-conformist’. When visitors to a Zoo exhibit were invited to write or draw answers to questions on cards to win a small prize and we manipulated the proportion of text versus drawings on display, we found a strong and significant effect of the proportion of text displayed on the proportion of text in the answers, a conformist effect that was largely linear with a small non-linear component. However, although this overall effect is important to understand cultural evolution, it might mask a greater diversity of behavioral responses shaped by variables such as age, sex, social environment and attention of the participants. Accordingly we performed a further study explicitly to analyze the effects of these variables, together with the quality of the information participants' responses made available to further visitors. Results again showed a largely linear conformity effect that varied little with the variables analyzed.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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Copyright: © 2014 Claidière et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2014 Claidière et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.