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dc.contributor.authorBerger-Tal, Oded
dc.contributor.authorNathan, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorMeron, Ehud
dc.contributor.authorSaltz, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
dc.date.available2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0095693
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/545
dc.description.abstractThe trade-off between the need to obtain new knowledge and the need to use that knowledge to improve performance is one of the most basic trade-offs in nature, and optimal performance usually requires some balance between exploratory and exploitative behaviors. Researchers in many disciplines have been searching for the optimal solution to this dilemma. Here we present a novel model in which the exploration strategy itself is dynamic and varies with time in order to optimize a definite goal, such as the acquisition of energy, money, or prestige. Our model produced four very distinct phases: Knowledge establishment, Knowledge accumulation, Knowledge maintenance, and Knowledge exploitation, giving rise to a multidisciplinary framework that applies equally to humans, animals, and organizations. The framework can be used to explain a multitude of phenomena in various disciplines, such as the movement of animals in novel landscapes, the most efficient resource allocation for a start-up company, or the effects of old age on knowledge acquisition in humans.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Exploration-Exploitation Dilemma
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0095693
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2014 Berger-Tal et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectMODELS
dc.subjectLEARNING
dc.subjectFORAGING
dc.relation.vimeoBerger-Tal_2014_PLOS One.PDF
dc.titleThe exploration-exploitation dilemma: A Multidisciplinary framework
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePLOS ONE
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpagee95693
dc.source.endpagee95693
dcterms.dateAccepted2014
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
html.description.abstractThe trade-off between the need to obtain new knowledge and the need to use that knowledge to improve performance is one of the most basic trade-offs in nature, and optimal performance usually requires some balance between exploratory and exploitative behaviors. Researchers in many disciplines have been searching for the optimal solution to this dilemma. Here we present a novel model in which the exploration strategy itself is dynamic and varies with time in order to optimize a definite goal, such as the acquisition of energy, money, or prestige. Our model produced four very distinct phases: Knowledge establishment, Knowledge accumulation, Knowledge maintenance, and Knowledge exploitation, giving rise to a multidisciplinary framework that applies equally to humans, animals, and organizations. The framework can be used to explain a multitude of phenomena in various disciplines, such as the movement of animals in novel landscapes, the most efficient resource allocation for a start-up company, or the effects of old age on knowledge acquisition in humans.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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Copyright: © 2014 Berger-Tal et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2014 Berger-Tal et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited