Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPasachnik, Stesha A.
dc.contributor.authorCarreras De Leon, R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
dc.date.available2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/546
dc.description.abstractHispaniola is second only to Cuba in size and biodiversity among West Indian islands, and is unique in being the only island with two native species of Rock Iguanas, the Rhinoceros Iguana (Cyclura cornuta; Fig. 1) and Ricord’s Iguana (C. ricordii). The island’s geologic history is likely responsible. Hispaniola was formed during the middle Miocene when North and South paleoislands joined (Graham 2003). A logical hypothesis suggests that each paleoisland held one species, and when the two islands joined, the ranges of both species shifted, eventually resulting in the distributions seen today. Cyclura ricordii is restricted to the southwestern Dominican Republic (DR) and just across the southern border into Haiti, whereas C. cornuta has a larger distribution throughout much of the arid lowlands across the entire island.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ircf.org/journal/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/RA_21.1_1-8_Pasachnik-CarrerasDeLeon_print.pdf
dc.rightsCopyright © 2014. Stesha A. Pasachnik. All rights reserved
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectCARIBBEAN ISLANDS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectBREEDING
dc.subjectHUSBANDRY
dc.subjectDIETS
dc.subjectPOPULATIONS
dc.subjectGENETICS
dc.titleLost iguanas: Trouble in paradise
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Reptile Conservation Foundation Journal. Reptiles and Amphibians Conservation and Natural History
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.beginpage1–8
dc.source.endpage1–8
dcterms.dateAccepted2014
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
html.description.abstractHispaniola is second only to Cuba in size and biodiversity among West Indian islands, and is unique in being the only island with two native species of Rock Iguanas, the Rhinoceros Iguana (Cyclura cornuta; Fig. 1) and Ricord’s Iguana (C. ricordii). The island’s geologic history is likely responsible. Hispaniola was formed during the middle Miocene when North and South paleoislands joined (Graham 2003). A logical hypothesis suggests that each paleoisland held one species, and when the two islands joined, the ranges of both species shifted, eventually resulting in the distributions seen today. Cyclura ricordii is restricted to the southwestern Dominican Republic (DR) and just across the southern border into Haiti, whereas C. cornuta has a larger distribution throughout much of the arid lowlands across the entire island.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Pasachnik_2014_IRCFReptilesAmp ...
Size:
6.339Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • ICR Research Publications
    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record