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dc.contributor.authorTracey, Jeff A.
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, James
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jun
dc.contributor.authorWei, Fuwen
dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Robert N.
dc.contributor.editorSueur, Cédric
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
dc.date.available2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0101205
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/548
dc.description.abstractAdvances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species – giant panda, dugong, and California condor – to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0101205
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.subjectDUGONGS
dc.subjectGIANT PANDAS
dc.subjectCALIFORNIA CONDORS
dc.subjectTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS
dc.subjectGIS
dc.subjectECOLOGY
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.titleMovement-based estimation and visualization of space use in 3D for wildlife ecology and conservation
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePLoS ONE
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue7
dc.source.beginpagee101205
dc.source.endpagee101205
dcterms.dateAccepted2014
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-14T19:47:01Z
html.description.abstractAdvances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species – giant panda, dugong, and California condor – to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research.
dc.contributor.bookauthorSueur, Cédric


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This is an open-access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.