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dc.contributor.authorGrant, Tandora D.
dc.contributor.authorBradley, K. A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2307-8235
dc.identifier.doi10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T6031A3098403.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/580
dc.description.abstractAlthough it is believed the Anegada Rock Iguana population size has increased somewhat since the headstarting programme began releasing subadults, the habitat is continuing to be degraded. The significant population reduction (> 80%) for this species occurred over a much longer time period than three generations (66 years) ago due to the introduction of invasive alien species and human settlement. Most of these threats have not ceased for the remnant population and habitat destruction for development has increased. Natural juvenile recruitment is nearly zero due to feral cats preying on hatchlings. This invasive predator must be eradicated in order to solidify the iguana’s long-term future and eliminate the need for continued headstarting. This iguana's estimated extent of occurrence is 56.7 km2 , is endemic to only one island, and qualifies for listing as Critically Endangered.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.iucnredlist.org/species/6031/3098403
dc.rightsCopyright 2020 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectCARIBBEAN ISLANDS
dc.subjectPREDATORS
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.titleCyclura pinguis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020
dc.title.alternativeCyclura pinguis, Anegada Rock Iguana
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.source.beginpagee.T6031A3098403
dc.source.numberofpages16
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractAlthough it is believed the Anegada Rock Iguana population size has increased somewhat since the headstarting programme began releasing subadults, the habitat is continuing to be degraded. The significant population reduction (> 80%) for this species occurred over a much longer time period than three generations (66 years) ago due to the introduction of invasive alien species and human settlement. Most of these threats have not ceased for the remnant population and habitat destruction for development has increased. Natural juvenile recruitment is nearly zero due to feral cats preying on hatchlings. This invasive predator must be eradicated in order to solidify the iguana’s long-term future and eliminate the need for continued headstarting. This iguana's estimated extent of occurrence is 56.7 km2 , is endemic to only one island, and qualifies for listing as Critically Endangered.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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