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dc.contributor.authorFisher, R.
dc.contributor.authorHathaway, S.
dc.contributor.authorGray, K.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Tandora D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2307-8235
dc.identifier.doi10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T152294642A152294669.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/581
dc.description.abstractGau Banded Iguanas are known to occur only on Gau Island, Fiji, and have an estimated extent of occurrence and area of occupancy of 220 km2 . Over 50% of the natural habitat of Gau has been degraded or converted due to illegal forest burning practices and free-roaming domestic goat competitors. The iguana population is suspected to have declined correspondingly during the last 30–45 years (three generations). There is continuing predation pressure on iguanas from invasive alien rats, feral cats, and free-roaming domestic pigs. Without conservation intervention, habitat degradation observed during the last 20 years is projected to cause a further 10–20% decline over the next 10–15 years.
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.iucnredlist.org/species/152294642/152294669
dc.rightsCopyright 2020 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectSOUTH PACIFIC
dc.subjectPREDATORS
dc.titleBrachylophus gau. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020
dc.title.alternativeBrachylophus gau, Gau Banded Iguana
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.source.beginpagee.T152294642A152294669
dc.source.numberofpages15
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractGau Banded Iguanas are known to occur only on Gau Island, Fiji, and have an estimated extent of occurrence and area of occupancy of 220 km2 . Over 50% of the natural habitat of Gau has been degraded or converted due to illegal forest burning practices and free-roaming domestic goat competitors. The iguana population is suspected to have declined correspondingly during the last 30–45 years (three generations). There is continuing predation pressure on iguanas from invasive alien rats, feral cats, and free-roaming domestic pigs. Without conservation intervention, habitat degradation observed during the last 20 years is projected to cause a further 10–20% decline over the next 10–15 years.


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