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dc.contributor.authorGarcia, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorFiguerola, C.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Tandora D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2307-8235
dc.identifier.doi10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T29605A2790768.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/582
dc.description.abstractAlthough it is believed that the Mona Rhinoceros Iguana population size has increased somewhat since the last systematic survey of 2000 due to initial conservation efforts, the habitat is continuing to be degraded. Juvenile recruitment is impacted by the combined effects of feral pigs eating incubating eggs and cats preying on hatchlings. These invasive predators must be eradicated in order to solidify the longterm future of the iguana. In addition, removal of the Australian Pine plantation is necessary to restore prime nesting areas. The significant population reduction (>75%) for this species occurred much longer than three generations ago due to the introduction of invasive alien species and periods of settlement for mining, agriculture, and fishing. Some of these threats have not ceased for the remnant population, particularly the impacts of predators. The iguana is endemic to only one island, with an estimated extent of occurrence of 80 km², and qualifies for listing as Critically Endangered.
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.iucnredlist.org/species/29605/2790768
dc.rightsCopyright 2020 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectCARIBBEAN ISLANDS
dc.subjectPREDATORS
dc.titleCyclura stejnegeri. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020
dc.title.alternativeCyclura stejnegeri, Mona Rhinoceros Iguana
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.source.beginpagee.T29605A2790768
dc.source.numberofpages15
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractAlthough it is believed that the Mona Rhinoceros Iguana population size has increased somewhat since the last systematic survey of 2000 due to initial conservation efforts, the habitat is continuing to be degraded. Juvenile recruitment is impacted by the combined effects of feral pigs eating incubating eggs and cats preying on hatchlings. These invasive predators must be eradicated in order to solidify the longterm future of the iguana. In addition, removal of the Australian Pine plantation is necessary to restore prime nesting areas. The significant population reduction (>75%) for this species occurred much longer than three generations ago due to the introduction of invasive alien species and periods of settlement for mining, agriculture, and fishing. Some of these threats have not ceased for the remnant population, particularly the impacts of predators. The iguana is endemic to only one island, with an estimated extent of occurrence of 80 km², and qualifies for listing as Critically Endangered.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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