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dc.contributor.authorKumar, K.
dc.contributor.authorGentile, G.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Tandora D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T22:44:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2307-8235
dc.identifier.doi10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T5240A3014082.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/585
dc.description.abstractThe Galápagos Land Iguana has a mostly outdated population size estimate of ca 10,000 mature individuals, in 13 subpopulations that are fragmented from each other by vast lava flows or are on isolated islands. With the exception of Baltra where the subpopulation had been extirpated, subpopulations were considered healthy three generations ago in the 1950s. Since that time, iguanas have been nearly extirpated from most of southern Isabela and Santa Cruz, and have declined in northern Isabela. Juveniles are rarely observed in these remaining nine locations due to continued predation by feral cats. Iguanas are small in number but relatively stable on Fernandina and Plaza Sur. They have increased again on the small islands of Baltra and Seymour Norte (likely to carrying capacity on the latter), due to conservation efforts. Overall, considering the assumed population (current andformer) sizes on the larger islands, it is estimated the population has declined by at least 30% over the last three generations. A minimum estimate of 10–15% decline is projected during the future three generations, based on the presence of invasive alien predators in some subpopulations and impacting juvenile recruitment. The estimated extent of occurrence meets the Vulnerable threshold at 9,524 km2 and the area of occupancy is crudely estimated to be 540 km2 . Further research on fine-scale distribution is needed to clarify an accurate occupancy status of the subpopulations.
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.iucnredlist.org/species/5240/3014082
dc.rightsCopyright 2020 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectGALAPAGOS
dc.subjectINVASIVE SPECIES
dc.subjectPREDATORS
dc.titleConolophus subcristatus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020
dc.title.alternativeConolophus subcristatus, Galápagos Land Iguana
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.source.beginpagee.T5240A3014082
dc.source.numberofpages19
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractThe Galápagos Land Iguana has a mostly outdated population size estimate of ca 10,000 mature individuals, in 13 subpopulations that are fragmented from each other by vast lava flows or are on isolated islands. With the exception of Baltra where the subpopulation had been extirpated, subpopulations were considered healthy three generations ago in the 1950s. Since that time, iguanas have been nearly extirpated from most of southern Isabela and Santa Cruz, and have declined in northern Isabela. Juveniles are rarely observed in these remaining nine locations due to continued predation by feral cats. Iguanas are small in number but relatively stable on Fernandina and Plaza Sur. They have increased again on the small islands of Baltra and Seymour Norte (likely to carrying capacity on the latter), due to conservation efforts. Overall, considering the assumed population (current andformer) sizes on the larger islands, it is estimated the population has declined by at least 30% over the last three generations. A minimum estimate of 10–15% decline is projected during the future three generations, based on the presence of invasive alien predators in some subpopulations and impacting juvenile recruitment. The estimated extent of occurrence meets the Vulnerable threshold at 9,524 km2 and the area of occupancy is crudely estimated to be 540 km2 . Further research on fine-scale distribution is needed to clarify an accurate occupancy status of the subpopulations.


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