Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorReynoso, V.H.
dc.contributor.authorVázquez-Cruz, M.
dc.contributor.authorRivera-Arroyo, R.C.
dc.contributor.authorBlázquez, M.C.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Tandora D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T22:44:02Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T22:44:02Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2307-8235
dc.identifier.doi10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T174475A1414471.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/598
dc.description.abstractThe Baja California Spiny-tailed Iguana has a wide distribution in the southern portion of the Baja California peninsula, south of Comondú. They seem to be structured in small and restricted subpopulations, with low but evident migration between them. Their extent of occurrence is 35,960 km 2 . They are most common in the southern Los Cabos region and less abundant in the north. Iguanas have not been recently found in several locations with former records. Iguanas are primarily threatened by habitat destruction and predation by free-roaming domestic cats and dogs near semi-urban areas and the periphery of large cities. Populations in the north may experience fluctuations from severe and cyclic droughts. The overall population trend is unknown and estimated to be fewer than 700,000 adults. This species currently qualifies as Least Concern.
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.iucnredlist.org/species/174475/1414471
dc.rightsCopyright 2020 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectBAJA CALIFORNIA
dc.titleCtenosaura hemilopha. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020
dc.title.alternativeCtenosaura hemilopha, Baja California Spiny-tailed Iguana
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.source.beginpagee.T174475A1414471
dc.source.numberofpages13
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractThe Baja California Spiny-tailed Iguana has a wide distribution in the southern portion of the Baja California peninsula, south of Comondú. They seem to be structured in small and restricted subpopulations, with low but evident migration between them. Their extent of occurrence is 35,960 km 2 . They are most common in the southern Los Cabos region and less abundant in the north. Iguanas have not been recently found in several locations with former records. Iguanas are primarily threatened by habitat destruction and predation by free-roaming domestic cats and dogs near semi-urban areas and the periphery of large cities. Populations in the north may experience fluctuations from severe and cyclic droughts. The overall population trend is unknown and estimated to be fewer than 700,000 adults. This species currently qualifies as Least Concern.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • ICR Research Publications
    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record