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dc.contributor.authorReynoso, V.H.
dc.contributor.authorVázquez-Cruz, M.
dc.contributor.authorRivera-Arroyo, R.C.
dc.contributor.authorMorales-Mávil, J.
dc.contributor.authorZarza-Franco, E.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Tandora D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-24T22:44:02Z
dc.date.available2020-07-24T22:44:02Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2307-8235
dc.identifier.doi10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T174476A1414477.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/601
dc.description.abstractThe Sonoran Spiny-tailed Iguana is widely, but unevenly distributed in Sonora, Sinaloa, and a small portion of southwestern Chihuahua, México. In this area, 29% of their habitat has been converted to large- and small-scale agricultural, ranching, and urban uses. It is suspected that there has been a rate of loss in the iguana population correlated to this habitat loss; 20% of this loss occurred more than three generations ago. The population seems to be structured in small, isolated subpopulations, with large concentrations in some areas and absent in others. There are no data available on the population size, trend, or density at any locality. They are able to exist in mildly human-impacted areas, such as the peripheries of crop/ranchlands and suburban areas, however, here they are more vulnerable to predation by free-ranging and feral cats and dogs. Survival of juveniles may be limited as a result. In some regions iguanas are persecuted as a pest, while in others they are not intentionally harmed and can be found in city gardens. Hunting for human food occurs mostly for celebrations and is declining according to local interviews. There are no quantitative data on the level of this take. At the southern end of their range, these iguanas are declining in number as they hybridize with the resident Guerreran Spiny-tailed Iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata). Currently, they are considered Least Concern, but further research on the population size, trends, and threats is needed.
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.iucnredlist.org/species/174476/1414477
dc.rightsCopyright 2020 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
dc.subjectIGUANAS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectMEXICO
dc.titleCtenosaura macrolopha. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020
dc.title.alternativeCtenosaura macrolopha, Sonoran Spiny-tailed Iguana
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.source.beginpagee.T174476A1414477
dc.source.numberofpages14
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractThe Sonoran Spiny-tailed Iguana is widely, but unevenly distributed in Sonora, Sinaloa, and a small portion of southwestern Chihuahua, México. In this area, 29% of their habitat has been converted to large- and small-scale agricultural, ranching, and urban uses. It is suspected that there has been a rate of loss in the iguana population correlated to this habitat loss; 20% of this loss occurred more than three generations ago. The population seems to be structured in small, isolated subpopulations, with large concentrations in some areas and absent in others. There are no data available on the population size, trend, or density at any locality. They are able to exist in mildly human-impacted areas, such as the peripheries of crop/ranchlands and suburban areas, however, here they are more vulnerable to predation by free-ranging and feral cats and dogs. Survival of juveniles may be limited as a result. In some regions iguanas are persecuted as a pest, while in others they are not intentionally harmed and can be found in city gardens. Hunting for human food occurs mostly for celebrations and is declining according to local interviews. There are no quantitative data on the level of this take. At the southern end of their range, these iguanas are declining in number as they hybridize with the resident Guerreran Spiny-tailed Iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata). Currently, they are considered Least Concern, but further research on the population size, trends, and threats is needed.


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