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dc.contributor.authorRalainasolo, F.B
dc.contributor.authorRaveloarimalala, M.L
dc.contributor.authorRandrianasolo, H.
dc.contributor.authorReuter, K.E
dc.contributor.authorHeriniaina, R
dc.contributor.authorClarke, T
dc.contributor.authorRavaloharimanitra, M.
dc.contributor.authorVolampeno, S.
dc.contributor.authorDonati, G
dc.contributor.authorRazafindramanana, J.
dc.contributor.authorAndriantsimanarilafy, R.R
dc.contributor.authorRandriatahina, G.
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, M
dc.contributor.authorEppley, Timothy M.
dc.contributor.authorBorgerson, C.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-31T22:13:27Z
dc.date.available2020-07-31T22:13:27Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2307-8235
dc.identifier.doi10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T9676A115564982.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/619
dc.description.abstractListed as Critically Endangered as the species has been observed to have undergone a population reduction of greater than or equal to 80% over a period of 27 years (three generations), due primarily to continuing decline in area, extent and quality of habitat, in addition to exploitation through unsustainable hunting pressure. These causes have not ceased, and will to a large extent not be easily reversible.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.iucnredlist.org/species/9676/115564982
dc.rightsCopyright 2020 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
dc.subjectLEMURS
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectIUCN
dc.subjectMADAGASCAR
dc.titleAlaotra reed lemur (Hapalemur alaotrensis). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020
dc.title.alternativeHapalemur alaotrensis, Alaotra Reed Lemur
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.source.beginpagee.T9676A115564982
dc.source.numberofpages11
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
html.description.abstractListed as Critically Endangered as the species has been observed to have undergone a population reduction of greater than or equal to 80% over a period of 27 years (three generations), due primarily to continuing decline in area, extent and quality of habitat, in addition to exploitation through unsustainable hunting pressure. These causes have not ceased, and will to a large extent not be easily reversible.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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