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dc.contributor.authorWatsa, Mrinalini
dc.contributor.authorWildlife Disease Surveillance Focus Group
dc.contributor.authorErkenswick, G.
dc.contributor.authorProst, S.
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Elizabeth Oneita
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorKubiski, Steven V.
dc.contributor.authorWitte, Carmel L.
dc.contributor.authorOgden, R.
dc.contributor.authorMeredith, A.
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorSteiner, Cynthia C.
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, J.A.
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Megan A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T22:10:05Z
dc.date.available2020-08-07T22:10:05Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075, 1095-9203
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.abc0017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/627
dc.descriptionThere is strong evidence that since 2000 zoonotic coronaviruses have caused three large human disease outbreaks - SARS, MERS, and now the pandemic, COVID-19. Coronaviruses are far from being the only known zoonotic agents: Ebola has a bat reservoir, HIV spilled over from nonhuman primates, and H5N1 and H1N1 influenza strains came from domestic birds and pigs. How humans interact with wildlife going forward is at the fulcrum of emergent disease risk assessments. In this article we address the risks of zoonotic disease outbreaks in the legal and illegal wildlife trades, and among wild animals. We then make a case for the routine application of portable molecular diagnostics at zoonotic hotspots via a decentralized laboratory network and a central database for screening and sequencing results. By implementing a coordinated, standardized and affordable global biomonitoring system, we can anticipate and better react to nascent zoonoses that could threaten global health.
dc.description.abstractEvidence suggests that zoonotic (animal origin) coronaviruses have caused three recent emerging infectious disease (EID) outbreaks: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In the search for an intermediate host for SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19), studies have identified SARS-CoV-2–like strains in bats (1) and pangolins (2), but these do not contain the same polybasic cleavage site that is present in SARS-CoV-2 (3). It is unknown what the intermediate host for this spillover event was because to date there are no international or national conventions on pathogen screening associated with animals, animal products, or their movements, and capacity for EID diagnostics is limited along much of the human-wildlife interface....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://science.sciencemag.org/content/369/6500/145
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020, American Association for the Advancement of Science. http://www.sciencemag.org/about/science-licenses-journal-article-reuseThis is an article distributed under the terms of the Science Journals Default License.
dc.subjectZOONOSES
dc.subjectVIROLOGY
dc.subjectTECHNOLOGY
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.subjectHEALTH
dc.titleRigorous wildlife disease surveillance
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleScience
dc.source.volume369
dc.source.issue6500
dc.source.beginpage145
dc.source.endpage147
html.description.abstractEvidence suggests that zoonotic (animal origin) coronaviruses have caused three recent emerging infectious disease (EID) outbreaks: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In the search for an intermediate host for SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19), studies have identified SARS-CoV-2–like strains in bats (1) and pangolins (2), but these do not contain the same polybasic cleavage site that is present in SARS-CoV-2 (3). It is unknown what the intermediate host for this spillover event was because to date there are no international or national conventions on pathogen screening associated with animals, animal products, or their movements, and capacity for EID diagnostics is limited along much of the human-wildlife interface....


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  • Conservation Science Publications
    Works by SDZWA's Conservation Scientists and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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