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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Lance J.
dc.contributor.authorVicino, Greg A.
dc.contributor.authorSheftel, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorLauderdale, Lisa K.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T22:10:06Z
dc.date.available2020-08-07T22:10:06Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ani10071211
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/628
dc.description.abstractModern day zoos and aquariums continuously assess the welfare of their animals and use evidence to make informed management decisions. Historically, many of the indicators of animal welfare used to assess the collection are negative indicators of welfare, such as stereotypic behavior. However, a lack of negative indicators of animal welfare does not demonstrate that an individual animal is thriving. There is a need for validated measures of positive animal welfare and there is a growing body of evidence that supports the use of behavioral diversity as a positive indicator of welfare. This includes an inverse relationship with stereotypic behavior as well as fecal glucocorticoid metabolites and is typically higher in situations thought to promote positive welfare. This review article highlights previous research on behavioral diversity as a potential positive indicator of welfare. Details are provided on how to calculate behavioral diversity and how to use it when evaluating animal welfare. Finally, the review will indicate how behavioral diversity can be used to inform an evidence-based management approach to animal care and welfare.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/10/7/1211
dc.rights© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectANIMAL WELFARE
dc.subjectHEALTH
dc.subjectZOO ANIMALS
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectFECES
dc.subjectSTEREOTYPIES
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.titleBehavioral diversity as a potential indicator of positive animal welfare
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAnimals
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.issue7
dc.source.beginpage1211
dcterms.dateAccepted
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-07T22:15:05Z
atmire.accessrights
html.description.abstractModern day zoos and aquariums continuously assess the welfare of their animals and use evidence to make informed management decisions. Historically, many of the indicators of animal welfare used to assess the collection are negative indicators of welfare, such as stereotypic behavior. However, a lack of negative indicators of animal welfare does not demonstrate that an individual animal is thriving. There is a need for validated measures of positive animal welfare and there is a growing body of evidence that supports the use of behavioral diversity as a positive indicator of welfare. This includes an inverse relationship with stereotypic behavior as well as fecal glucocorticoid metabolites and is typically higher in situations thought to promote positive welfare. This review article highlights previous research on behavioral diversity as a potential positive indicator of welfare. Details are provided on how to calculate behavioral diversity and how to use it when evaluating animal welfare. Finally, the review will indicate how behavioral diversity can be used to inform an evidence-based management approach to animal care and welfare.


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access
article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution
(CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).