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dc.contributor.authorLandsberg, J.H.
dc.contributor.authorKiryu, Y.
dc.contributor.authorTabuchi, M.
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Asa
dc.contributor.authorPessier, Allan P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-28T21:03:01Z
dc.date.available2020-08-28T21:03:01Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.3354/dao02625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/655
dc.description.abstractA multispecies amphibian larval mortality event, primarily affecting American bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus, was investigated during April 2011 at the Mike Roess Gold Head Branch State Park, Clay County, Florida, USA. Freshly dead and moribund tadpoles had hemorrhagic lesions around the vent and on the ventral body surface, with some exhibiting a swollen abdomen. Bullfrogs (100%), southern leopard frogs L. sphenocephalus (33.3%), and gopher frogs L. capito (100%) were infected by alveolate parasites. The intensity of infection in bullfrog livers was high. Tadpoles were evaluated for frog virus 3 (FV3) by histology and PCR. For those southern leopard frog tadpoles (n = 2) whose livers had not been obscured by alveolate spore infection, neither a pathologic response nor intracytoplasmic inclusions typically associated with clinical infections of FV3-like ranavirus were noted. Sequencing of a portion (496 bp) of the viral major capsid protein gene confirmed FV3-like virus in bullfrogs (n = 1, plus n = 6 pooled) and southern leopard frogs (n = 1, plus n = 4 pooled). In July 2011, young-of-the-year bullfrog tadpoles (n = 7) were negative for alveolate parasites, but 1 gopher frog tadpole was positive. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed mortality event for amphibians in Florida associated with FV3-like virus, but the extent to which the virus played a primary role is uncertain. Larval mortality was most likely caused by a combination of alveolate parasite infections, FV3-like ranavirus, and undetermined etiological factors.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3354/dao02625
dc.rights© The authors 2013. Open Access under Creative Commons by Attribution Licence. Use, distribution and reproduction are un - restricted. Authors and original publication must be credited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectFROGS
dc.subjectAMERICAN BULLFROG
dc.subjectSOUTHERN U.S.
dc.subjectPARASITES
dc.subject|HEALTH
dc.subjectVIROLOGY
dc.subjectDIAGNOSIS
dc.titleCo-infection by alveolate parasites and frog virus 3-like ranavirus during an amphibian larval mortality event in Florida, USA
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleDiseases of Aquatic Organisms
dc.source.volume105
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage89
dc.source.endpage99
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-28T21:03:01Z
html.description.abstractA multispecies amphibian larval mortality event, primarily affecting American bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus, was investigated during April 2011 at the Mike Roess Gold Head Branch State Park, Clay County, Florida, USA. Freshly dead and moribund tadpoles had hemorrhagic lesions around the vent and on the ventral body surface, with some exhibiting a swollen abdomen. Bullfrogs (100%), southern leopard frogs L. sphenocephalus (33.3%), and gopher frogs L. capito (100%) were infected by alveolate parasites. The intensity of infection in bullfrog livers was high. Tadpoles were evaluated for frog virus 3 (FV3) by histology and PCR. For those southern leopard frog tadpoles (n = 2) whose livers had not been obscured by alveolate spore infection, neither a pathologic response nor intracytoplasmic inclusions typically associated with clinical infections of FV3-like ranavirus were noted. Sequencing of a portion (496 bp) of the viral major capsid protein gene confirmed FV3-like virus in bullfrogs (n = 1, plus n = 6 pooled) and southern leopard frogs (n = 1, plus n = 4 pooled). In July 2011, young-of-the-year bullfrog tadpoles (n = 7) were negative for alveolate parasites, but 1 gopher frog tadpole was positive. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed mortality event for amphibians in Florida associated with FV3-like virus, but the extent to which the virus played a primary role is uncertain. Larval mortality was most likely caused by a combination of alveolate parasite infections, FV3-like ranavirus, and undetermined etiological factors.


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© The authors 2013. Open Access under Creative Commons by
Attribution Licence. Use, distribution and reproduction are un -
restricted. Authors and original publication must be credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The authors 2013. Open Access under Creative Commons by Attribution Licence. Use, distribution and reproduction are un - restricted. Authors and original publication must be credited.