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dc.contributor.authorTan, Chia L.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yeqin
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Kefeng
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-28T21:03:02Z
dc.date.available2020-08-28T21:03:02Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn0032-8332, 1610-7365
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10329-012-0318-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/662
dc.description.abstractMost living primates exhibit a daytime or nighttime activity pattern. Strict diurnality is thought to be the rule among anthropoids except for owl monkeys. Here we report the diel activity pattern of an Asian colobine, the Guizhou snub-nosed monkey Rhinopithecus brelichi, based on a methodology that relied on using 24-h continuously operating camera traps. We conducted the study in Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve in Guizhou, China from March 22 to May 19 and from June 17 to October 14, 2011. After standardizing all time elements to a meridian-based time according to the geographic coordinates of the study site, we showed unequivocally that the monkeys, though predominantly diurnal, exhibited activity beyond daylight hours throughout the study. Specifically, their activity at night and during twilight periods suggests a complex interplay of behavioral adaptations, among others, to living in a temperate environment where day length and food resources fluctuate substantially across seasons. We contend that, under prevailing ecological conditions, so-called strictly diurnal primates may adjust their activity schedule opportunistically in order to increase energy intake. We also discuss the advantages of using camera traps in primate studies, and how the standardized use of meridian-based time by researchers would benefit comparisons of diel activity patterns among primates.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10329-012-0318-2
dc.rightsCopyright The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
dc.subjectCAMERA TRAPS
dc.subjectCHINA
dc.subjectPRIMATES
dc.subjectCOLOBUS
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectADAPTATION
dc.titleInto the night: camera traps reveal nocturnal activity in a presumptive diurnal primate, (Rhinopithecus brelichi)
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePrimates
dc.source.volume54
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage1-6
html.description.abstractMost living primates exhibit a daytime or nighttime activity pattern. Strict diurnality is thought to be the rule among anthropoids except for owl monkeys. Here we report the diel activity pattern of an Asian colobine, the Guizhou snub-nosed monkey Rhinopithecus brelichi, based on a methodology that relied on using 24-h continuously operating camera traps. We conducted the study in Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve in Guizhou, China from March 22 to May 19 and from June 17 to October 14, 2011. After standardizing all time elements to a meridian-based time according to the geographic coordinates of the study site, we showed unequivocally that the monkeys, though predominantly diurnal, exhibited activity beyond daylight hours throughout the study. Specifically, their activity at night and during twilight periods suggests a complex interplay of behavioral adaptations, among others, to living in a temperate environment where day length and food resources fluctuate substantially across seasons. We contend that, under prevailing ecological conditions, so-called strictly diurnal primates may adjust their activity schedule opportunistically in order to increase energy intake. We also discuss the advantages of using camera traps in primate studies, and how the standardized use of meridian-based time by researchers would benefit comparisons of diel activity patterns among primates.


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Copyright The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com