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dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorFriese, Carrie
dc.contributor.authorGreely, Henry T.
dc.contributor.authorSandler, Ronald
dc.contributor.authorSaragusty, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorDurrant, Barbara S.
dc.contributor.authorRedford, Kent H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-04T21:11:17Z
dc.date.available2020-09-04T21:11:17Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2578-4854
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/csp2.241
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/675
dc.description.abstractThe northern white rhino (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) is functionally extinct with only two females left alive. However, cryopreserved material from a number of individuals represents the potential to produce additional individuals using advanced reproductive and genetic rescue technologies and perhaps eventually a population to return to their native range. If this could and were done, how should it be done responsibly and thoughtfully. What issues and questions of a technical, bioethical, and societal nature will it raise that need to be anticipated and addressed? Such issues are explored in this article by an interdisciplinary team assembled to provide context to the northern white rhino project of the San Diego Zoo Global.
dc.relation.urlhttps://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/csp2.241
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSAN DIEGO ZOO
dc.subjectWHITE RHINOCEROSES
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectREPRODUCTION
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectGENETICS
dc.subjectEXTINCT ANIMALS
dc.subjectGENOMICS
dc.subjectFROZEN ZOO
dc.titleExploring the limits of saving a subspecies: The ethics and social dynamics of restoring northern white rhinos (Ceratotherium simum cottoni)
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleConservation Science and Practice
dc.source.volume2
dc.source.issue8
dc.source.beginpagee241
html.description.abstractThe northern white rhino (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) is functionally extinct with only two females left alive. However, cryopreserved material from a number of individuals represents the potential to produce additional individuals using advanced reproductive and genetic rescue technologies and perhaps eventually a population to return to their native range. If this could and were done, how should it be done responsibly and thoughtfully. What issues and questions of a technical, bioethical, and societal nature will it raise that need to be anticipated and addressed? Such issues are explored in this article by an interdisciplinary team assembled to provide context to the northern white rhino project of the San Diego Zoo Global.


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    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.  This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.