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dc.contributor.authorTan, Chia L.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Y.
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Kefeng
dc.contributor.authorLei, Shi
dc.contributor.authorWeiyong, Zhang
dc.contributor.authorRiondato, Isidoro
dc.contributor.authorGiacoma, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorBalletto, Emilio
dc.contributor.authorGamba, Marco
dc.contributor.authorJohn, A. Phillips
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T21:26:42Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T21:26:42Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citation
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/693
dc.description.abstractSan Diego Zoo Global (USA), Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve Administration (China), and the University of Torino (Italy) have partnered in a collaborative effort to promote environmental sustainability and biodiversity conservation in Guizhou, China. The objectives of the partnership are twofold: (i) train researchers and wildlife professionals using a multidisciplinary program that employs the latest methods and tools in order to deepen their understanding of wildlife and the environment, and (ii) foster positive attitudes and behaviour toward wildlife in rural children through a creative education program called the Little Green Guards. A recent development of the education program is the Little Green Guards Club for children whose houses border nature reserves. During club meetings, staff of the three cooperating institutions and volunteers participated in teaching English and natural history lessons. Club activities included animal themed art projects, games, movies, and field trips designed to cultivate empathy for animals and appreciation for nature in these children. Evaluations conducted before and after implementation of the education program showed a significant increase in children’s knowledge of and affection for wildlife, and sometimes coincided with positive behavioural changes toward native species. Here we feature our collaborative effort in China as a model which can be adopted in other geographic regions where species and habitat conservation must become a top priority. We will discuss the role of Universities in critical assessment of previous experiences in order to enhance the effectiveness of cooperation with other development stakeholders (e.g. governmental and local authorities, civil society and NGOs, foundations and private companies, and local associations).
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/2318/1505039
dc.rightsOpen Access
dc.subjectCHINA
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectEDUCATION
dc.subjectHABITAT CONSERVATION
dc.subjectBIODIVERSITY
dc.subjectHUMANS
dc.subjectSAN DIEGO ZOO
dc.titleFostering “Little Green Guards ” through a collaborative partnership to create an effective conservation education program for rural children in Guizhou, China
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedings
dc.source.beginpage67
dc.source.endpage72
html.description.abstractSan Diego Zoo Global (USA), Fanjingshan National Nature Reserve Administration (China), and the University of Torino (Italy) have partnered in a collaborative effort to promote environmental sustainability and biodiversity conservation in Guizhou, China. The objectives of the partnership are twofold: (i) train researchers and wildlife professionals using a multidisciplinary program that employs the latest methods and tools in order to deepen their understanding of wildlife and the environment, and (ii) foster positive attitudes and behaviour toward wildlife in rural children through a creative education program called the Little Green Guards. A recent development of the education program is the Little Green Guards Club for children whose houses border nature reserves. During club meetings, staff of the three cooperating institutions and volunteers participated in teaching English and natural history lessons. Club activities included animal themed art projects, games, movies, and field trips designed to cultivate empathy for animals and appreciation for nature in these children. Evaluations conducted before and after implementation of the education program showed a significant increase in children’s knowledge of and affection for wildlife, and sometimes coincided with positive behavioural changes toward native species. Here we feature our collaborative effort in China as a model which can be adopted in other geographic regions where species and habitat conservation must become a top priority. We will discuss the role of Universities in critical assessment of previous experiences in order to enhance the effectiveness of cooperation with other development stakeholders (e.g. governmental and local authorities, civil society and NGOs, foundations and private companies, and local associations).
dc.source.conferenceIII Congresso scientifico della Rete CUCS - Coordinamento Universitario per la Cooperazione allo Sviluppo. JUNCO. Journal of Universities and International Development Cooperation


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  • ICR Research Publications
    Works by SDZG's Institute for Conservation Research staff and co-authors. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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