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dc.contributor.authorLinklater, W.L.
dc.contributor.authorGedir, J.V.
dc.contributor.authorLaw, P.R.
dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.contributor.authorAdcock, K.
dc.contributor.authorDu Preez, P.
dc.contributor.authorKnight, M.
dc.contributor.authorKerley, G.I.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-06T22:11:59Z
dc.date.available2020-11-06T22:11:59Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0030664
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/751
dc.description.abstractSpecies translocations are remarkable experiments in evolutionary ecology, and increasingly critical to biodiversity conservation. Elaborate socio-ecological hypotheses for translocation success, based on theoretical fitness relationships, are untested and lead to complex uncertainty rather than parsimonious solutions. We used an extraordinary 89 reintroduction and 102 restocking events releasing 682 black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) to 81 reserves in southern Africa (1981–2005) to test the influence of interacting socio-ecological and individual characters on post-release survival.....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030664
dc.rights© 2012 Linklater et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/deed.en_US
dc.subjectSOUTHERN AFRICA
dc.subjectBLACK RHINOCEROSES
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectREINTRODUCTION
dc.subjectTRANSLOCATION
dc.subjectANIMAL ECOLOGY
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.titleTranslocations as experiments in the ecological resilience of an asocial mega-herbivore
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePLOS One
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage30664
dcterms.dateAccepted
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-06T22:14:30Z
html.description.abstractSpecies translocations are remarkable experiments in evolutionary ecology, and increasingly critical to biodiversity conservation. Elaborate socio-ecological hypotheses for translocation success, based on theoretical fitness relationships, are untested and lead to complex uncertainty rather than parsimonious solutions. We used an extraordinary 89 reintroduction and 102 restocking events releasing 682 black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) to 81 reserves in southern Africa (1981–2005) to test the influence of interacting socio-ecological and individual characters on post-release survival.....


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© 2012 Linklater et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2012 Linklater et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.