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dc.contributor.authorTing, Nelson
dc.contributor.authorAstaras, Christos
dc.contributor.authorHearn, Gail
dc.contributor.authorHonarvar, Shaya
dc.contributor.authorCorush, Joel
dc.contributor.authorBurrell, Andrew S.
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Bethan J.
dc.contributor.authorGadsby, Elizabeth L.
dc.contributor.authorRaaum, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorRoos, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-06T22:12:00Z
dc.date.available2020-11-06T22:12:00Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.98
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/752
dc.description.abstractIt is difficult to predict how current climate change will affect wildlife species adapted to a tropical rainforest environment. Understanding how population dynamics fluctuated in such species throughout periods of past climatic change can provide insight into this issue. The drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) is a large-bodied rainforest adapted mammal found in West Central Africa. In the middle of this endangered monkey's geographic range is Lake Barombi Mbo, which has a well-documented palynological record of environmental change that dates to the Late Pleistocene. We used a Bayesian coalescent-based framework to analyze 2,076 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA across wild drill populations to infer past changes in female effective population size since the Late Pleistocene. Our results suggest that the drill underwent a nearly 15-fold demographic collapse in female effective population size that was most prominent during the Mid Holocene (approximately 3-5 Ka). This time period coincides with a period of increased dryness and seasonality across Africa and a dramatic reduction in forest coverage at Lake Barombi Mbo. We believe that these changes in climate and forest coverage were the driving forces behind the drill population decline. Furthermore, the warm temperatures and increased aridity of the Mid Holocene are potentially analogous to current and future conditions faced by many tropical rainforest communities. In order to prevent future declines in population size in rainforest-adapted species such as the drill, large tracts of forest should be protected to both preserve habitat and prevent forest loss through aridification.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ece3.98
dc.rights© 2011 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
dc.subjectCENTRAL AFRICA
dc.subjectWEST AFRICA
dc.subjectDRILLS
dc.subjectCLIMATE CHANGE
dc.subjectENDANGERED ANIMALS
dc.subjectEVOLUTION
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.titleGenetic signatures of a demographic collapse in a large-bodied forest dwelling primate (Mandrillus leucophaeus)
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleEcology and Evolution
dc.source.volume2
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage550
dc.source.endpage561
dcterms.dateAccepted
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-06T22:16:42Z
html.description.abstractIt is difficult to predict how current climate change will affect wildlife species adapted to a tropical rainforest environment. Understanding how population dynamics fluctuated in such species throughout periods of past climatic change can provide insight into this issue. The drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) is a large-bodied rainforest adapted mammal found in West Central Africa. In the middle of this endangered monkey's geographic range is Lake Barombi Mbo, which has a well-documented palynological record of environmental change that dates to the Late Pleistocene. We used a Bayesian coalescent-based framework to analyze 2,076 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA across wild drill populations to infer past changes in female effective population size since the Late Pleistocene. Our results suggest that the drill underwent a nearly 15-fold demographic collapse in female effective population size that was most prominent during the Mid Holocene (approximately 3-5 Ka). This time period coincides with a period of increased dryness and seasonality across Africa and a dramatic reduction in forest coverage at Lake Barombi Mbo. We believe that these changes in climate and forest coverage were the driving forces behind the drill population decline. Furthermore, the warm temperatures and increased aridity of the Mid Holocene are potentially analogous to current and future conditions faced by many tropical rainforest communities. In order to prevent future declines in population size in rainforest-adapted species such as the drill, large tracts of forest should be protected to both preserve habitat and prevent forest loss through aridification.


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© 2011 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2011 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.