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dc.contributor.authorCharlton, Benjamin D.
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Megan A.
dc.contributor.authorSwaisgood, Ronald R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-29T21:30:29Z
dc.date.available2020-04-29T21:30:29Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier2041-1723
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-019-10768-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/77
dc.description.abstractAlthough signal characteristics and sensory systems are predicted to co-evolve according to environmental constraints, this hypothesis has not been tested for acoustic signalling across a wide range of species, or any mammal sensory modality. Here we use phylogenetic comparative techniques to show that mammal vocal characteristics and hearing sensitivity have co-evolved to utilise higher frequencies in forest environments – opposite to the general prediction that lower frequencies should be favoured in acoustically cluttered habitats. We also reveal an evolutionary trade-off between high frequency hearing sensitivity and the production of calls with high frequency acoustic energy that suggests forest mammals further optimise vocal communication according to their high frequency hearing sensitivity. Our results provide clear evidence of adaptive signal and sensory system coevolution. They also emphasize how constraints imposed by the signalling environment can jointly shape vocal signal structure and auditory systems, potentially driving acoustic diversity and reproductive isolation.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-10768-y
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBIOACOUSTICS
dc.subjectCOMMUNICATION
dc.subjectFORESTS
dc.titleCoevolution of vocal signal characteristics and hearing sensitivity in forest mammals
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleNature Communications
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage2778
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-29T22:49:01Z
html.description.abstractAlthough signal characteristics and sensory systems are predicted to co-evolve according to environmental constraints, this hypothesis has not been tested for acoustic signalling across a wide range of species, or any mammal sensory modality. Here we use phylogenetic comparative techniques to show that mammal vocal characteristics and hearing sensitivity have co-evolved to utilise higher frequencies in forest environments – opposite to the general prediction that lower frequencies should be favoured in acoustically cluttered habitats. We also reveal an evolutionary trade-off between high frequency hearing sensitivity and the production of calls with high frequency acoustic energy that suggests forest mammals further optimise vocal communication according to their high frequency hearing sensitivity. Our results provide clear evidence of adaptive signal and sensory system coevolution. They also emphasize how constraints imposed by the signalling environment can jointly shape vocal signal structure and auditory systems, potentially driving acoustic diversity and reproductive isolation.


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