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dc.contributor.authorBowie, Matthew J.
dc.contributor.authorDietrich, Timo
dc.contributor.authorCassey, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorVeríssimo, Diogo
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T21:18:34Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T21:18:34Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2578-4854
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/csp2.278
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/781
dc.description.abstractMany threats to biodiversity are the result of human actions, which means that changing human behavior can positively alter the trajectory of our current biodiversity crisis. While there is an increasing number of behavior change interventions being implemented in biodiversity conservation, their design is rarely informed by the people they try to influence, thereby lowering the probability of success. Building successful interventions requires substantial audience research, but this can be challenging for conservation projects with perennially limited time and resources. Here, we critically discuss co-design as a useful and effective approach for gathering audience insights relatively quickly, allowing conservation practitioners to integrate end-user voices when they would otherwise be excluded from intervention design. Specifically, we present a seven-step co-design process, providing an outline and guidance for how to generate more user-centric intervention ideas and transform them into feasible prototype interventions. Further, we show how we applied this seven-step process with coffee consumers in a sustainable conservation context. This study outlines contributions that showcase the value of user-centered design approaches to behavior change interventions for biodiversity conservation.
dc.description.sponsorship
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/csp2.278
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectBIODIVERSITY
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectCOMMUNITIES
dc.titleCo-designing behavior change interventions to conserve biodiversity
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleConservation Science and Practice
dc.source.volume2
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.beginpagee278
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-17T21:25:28Z
html.description.abstractMany threats to biodiversity are the result of human actions, which means that changing human behavior can positively alter the trajectory of our current biodiversity crisis. While there is an increasing number of behavior change interventions being implemented in biodiversity conservation, their design is rarely informed by the people they try to influence, thereby lowering the probability of success. Building successful interventions requires substantial audience research, but this can be challenging for conservation projects with perennially limited time and resources. Here, we critically discuss co-design as a useful and effective approach for gathering audience insights relatively quickly, allowing conservation practitioners to integrate end-user voices when they would otherwise be excluded from intervention design. Specifically, we present a seven-step co-design process, providing an outline and guidance for how to generate more user-centric intervention ideas and transform them into feasible prototype interventions. Further, we show how we applied this seven-step process with coffee consumers in a sustainable conservation context. This study outlines contributions that showcase the value of user-centered design approaches to behavior change interventions for biodiversity conservation.


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/