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dc.contributor.authorWong, P.B.Y.
dc.contributor.authorWiley, E.O.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, W.E.
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, S.J.
dc.contributor.authorHaussler, C.
dc.contributor.authorKoepfli, K.-P.
dc.contributor.authorHouck, Marlys L.
dc.contributor.authorPerelman, P.
dc.contributor.authorMastromonaco, G.
dc.contributor.authorBentley, A.C.
dc.contributor.authorVenkatesh, B.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y.-P.
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, R.W.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-30T23:22:04Z
dc.date.available2020-11-30T23:22:04Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn2047-217X
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/2047-217X-1-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/802
dc.description.abstractThe recent rise in speed and efficiency of new sequencing technologies have facilitated high-throughput sequencing, assembly and analyses of genomes, advancing ongoing efforts to analyze genetic sequences across major vertebrate groups. Standardized procedures in acquiring high quality DNA and RNA and establishing cell lines from target species will facilitate these initiatives. We provide a legal and methodological guide according to four standards of acquiring and storing tissue for the Genome 10K Project and similar initiatives as follows: four-star (banked tissue/cell cultures, RNA from multiple types of tissue for transcriptomes, and sufficient flash-frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA, all from a single individual); three-star (RNA as above and frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA); two-star (frozen tissue for at least 700 ?g of DNA); and one-star (ethanol-preserved tissue for 700 ?g of DNA or less of mixed quality). At a minimum, all tissues collected for the Genome 10K and other genomic projects should consider each species’ natural history and follow institutional and legal requirements. Associated documentation should detail as much information as possible about provenance to ensure representative sampling and subsequent sequencing. Hopefully, the procedures outlined here will not only encourage success in the Genome 10K Project but also inspire the adaptation of standards by other genomic projects, including those involving other biota.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/2047-217X-1-8
dc.rights© 2012 Wong et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
dc.subjectTECHNOLOGY
dc.subjectCHROMOSOMES
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectGENOMICS
dc.subjectBIODIVERSITY
dc.subjectEXPERIMENTAL METHODS
dc.subjectGUIDEBOOKS
dc.titleTissue sampling methods and standards for vertebrate genomics
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleGigaScience
dc.source.volume1
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage8
dcterms.dateAccepted
refterms.dateFOA2020-12-01T00:05:53Z
html.description.abstractThe recent rise in speed and efficiency of new sequencing technologies have facilitated high-throughput sequencing, assembly and analyses of genomes, advancing ongoing efforts to analyze genetic sequences across major vertebrate groups. Standardized procedures in acquiring high quality DNA and RNA and establishing cell lines from target species will facilitate these initiatives. We provide a legal and methodological guide according to four standards of acquiring and storing tissue for the Genome 10K Project and similar initiatives as follows: four-star (banked tissue/cell cultures, RNA from multiple types of tissue for transcriptomes, and sufficient flash-frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA, all from a single individual); three-star (RNA as above and frozen tissue for 1 mg of DNA); two-star (frozen tissue for at least 700 ?g of DNA); and one-star (ethanol-preserved tissue for 700 ?g of DNA or less of mixed quality). At a minimum, all tissues collected for the Genome 10K and other genomic projects should consider each species’ natural history and follow institutional and legal requirements. Associated documentation should detail as much information as possible about provenance to ensure representative sampling and subsequent sequencing. Hopefully, the procedures outlined here will not only encourage success in the Genome 10K Project but also inspire the adaptation of standards by other genomic projects, including those involving other biota.


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© 2012 Wong et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2012 Wong et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.