Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBoddy, Amy M.
dc.contributor.authorAbegglen, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.authorAktipis, Athena
dc.contributor.authorSchiffman, Joshua D.
dc.contributor.authorMaley, Carlo C.
dc.contributor.authorWitte, Carmel L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-23T19:19:22Z
dc.date.available2020-12-23T19:19:22Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/emph/eoaa025
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/817
dc.description.abstractIn our study, Lifetime cancer prevalence and life history traits in mammals, we reported the prevalence of neoplasia and malignancy in a select group of mammals housed at San Diego Zoo Global from 1964 to 1978 and 1987 to 2015 [1]. We also used these data to evaluate associations between life history traits and measures of population health. Our analysis showed placental invasiveness could not predict the proportion of animals diagnosed with neoplasia or malignancy. In a response to our article, Drs Wagner and colleagues describe a different calculation to test for a relationship between placental invasiveness and malignancy. They identified and included previously published veterinary neoplasia and malignancy data with our published dataset and suggest a positive relationship between placental invasiveness and development of malignancy (referred to as malignancy rate in Wagner and colleagues’ response). These data provided support for the Evolved Levels of Invasiveness (ELI) hypothesis [2]. We are pleased that other investigators find our data useful, and wholeheartedly agree with Drs Wagner and colleagues in the need to identify more data on cancer in a wide variety of species. Notwithstanding, this updated analysis brings up a number of topics that we would like to address....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/emph/article/2020/1/215/5873154
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCANCER
dc.subjectSAN DIEGO ZOO
dc.subjectHEALTH
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectVETERINARY MEDICINE
dc.subjectDATA PROCESSING
dc.subjectZOO ANIMALS
dc.titleDoes placental invasiveness lead to higher rates of malignant transformation in mammals?Response to: ‘Available data suggests positive relationship between placental invasion an malignancy’
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleEvolution, Medicine, and Public Health
dc.source.volume2020
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage215
dc.source.endpage216
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-14T22:57:28Z
html.description.abstractIn our study, Lifetime cancer prevalence and life history traits in mammals, we reported the prevalence of neoplasia and malignancy in a select group of mammals housed at San Diego Zoo Global from 1964 to 1978 and 1987 to 2015 [1]. We also used these data to evaluate associations between life history traits and measures of population health. Our analysis showed placental invasiveness could not predict the proportion of animals diagnosed with neoplasia or malignancy. In a response to our article, Drs Wagner and colleagues describe a different calculation to test for a relationship between placental invasiveness and malignancy. They identified and included previously published veterinary neoplasia and malignancy data with our published dataset and suggest a positive relationship between placental invasiveness and development of malignancy (referred to as malignancy rate in Wagner and colleagues’ response). These data provided support for the Evolved Levels of Invasiveness (ELI) hypothesis [2]. We are pleased that other investigators find our data useful, and wholeheartedly agree with Drs Wagner and colleagues in the need to identify more data on cancer in a wide variety of species. Notwithstanding, this updated analysis brings up a number of topics that we would like to address....


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Boddy_2020_EvolutionMedicinean ...
Size:
156.4Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • SDZG Research Publications
    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Global staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record

© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.