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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Elizabeth Oneita
dc.contributor.authorVeríssimo, Diogo
dc.contributor.authorCrudge, Brian
dc.contributor.authorLim, Thona
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Vichet
dc.contributor.authorGlikman, Jenny A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-19T00:21:56Z
dc.date.available2021-01-19T00:21:56Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2575-8314
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/pan3.10164
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/822
dc.description.abstractUnsustainable wildlife use is one of the leading threats to earth's biodiversity. Historically, efforts to address this issue have been focused on increasing enforcement and anti-poaching measures. However, recognition that such supply-reduction measures may be inefficient has spurred a movement towards consumer research and behaviour change. Here, we used consumer research to investigate the consumption of bear bile and gallbladder in Cambodia. Our aim was to gather key consumer insights such as demographics, beliefs and the identification of trusted individuals and communication channels, which could be used to underpin future behaviour change efforts to reduce the consumption of bear bile and gallbladder. To accomplish this, we conducted 4,512 structured quantitative interviews and 132 qualitative, semi-structured interviews across Cambodia. We found that although the level of bear bile and gallbladder consumption varied across the country, consumers were largely homogenous in their beliefs and choice of trusted messengers. This indicates that behaviour change interventions grounded in these results may be effective in any of the eight areas surveyed. We believe our study strategy can be adapted and followed by other conservation organizations to ensure they are capturing essential information necessary for designing effective behaviour change campaigns. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/pan3.10164
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. People and Nature published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectASIATIC BLACK BEARS
dc.subjectSUN BEARS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE TRADE
dc.subjectSOCIAL MEDIA
dc.subjectCAMBODIA
dc.subjectMARKETING
dc.subjectSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CRIME
dc.titleInsights for reducing the consumption of wildlife: The use of bear bile and gallbladder in Cambodia
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePeople and Nature
dc.source.volume2
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage950
dc.source.endpage963
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-02T01:52:14Z
html.description.abstractUnsustainable wildlife use is one of the leading threats to earth's biodiversity. Historically, efforts to address this issue have been focused on increasing enforcement and anti-poaching measures. However, recognition that such supply-reduction measures may be inefficient has spurred a movement towards consumer research and behaviour change. Here, we used consumer research to investigate the consumption of bear bile and gallbladder in Cambodia. Our aim was to gather key consumer insights such as demographics, beliefs and the identification of trusted individuals and communication channels, which could be used to underpin future behaviour change efforts to reduce the consumption of bear bile and gallbladder. To accomplish this, we conducted 4,512 structured quantitative interviews and 132 qualitative, semi-structured interviews across Cambodia. We found that although the level of bear bile and gallbladder consumption varied across the country, consumers were largely homogenous in their beliefs and choice of trusted messengers. This indicates that behaviour change interventions grounded in these results may be effective in any of the eight areas surveyed. We believe our study strategy can be adapted and followed by other conservation organizations to ensure they are capturing essential information necessary for designing effective behaviour change campaigns. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article.


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© 2020 The Authors. People and Nature published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society  This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 The Authors. People and Nature published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.