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dc.contributor.authorBen-Nun, Inbar Friedrich
dc.contributor.authorMontague, Susanne C
dc.contributor.authorHouck, Marlys L.
dc.contributor.authorTran, Ha T
dc.contributor.authorGaritaonandia, Ibon
dc.contributor.authorLeonardo, Trevor R
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yu-Chieh
dc.contributor.authorCharter, Suellen J.
dc.contributor.authorLaurent, Louise C
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorLoring, Jeanne F
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-02T01:45:35Z
dc.date.available2021-02-02T01:45:35Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1548-7091, 1548-7105
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nmeth.1706
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/843
dc.description.abstractFor some highly endangered species there are too few reproductively capable animals to maintain adequate genetic diversity, and extraordinary measures are necessary to prevent extinction. We report generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from two endangered species: a primate, the drill, Mandrillus leucophaeus and the nearly extinct northern white rhinoceros, Ceratotherium simum cottoni. iPSCs may eventually facilitate reintroduction of genetic material into breeding populations.
dc.description.sponsorship
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/nmeth.1706
dc.rightsCopyright © 2011, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.
dc.subjectBIODIVERSITY
dc.subjectGENOMICS
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectREPRODUCTION
dc.subjectSTEM CELLS
dc.subjectMANDRILLS
dc.subjectWHITE RHINOCEROSES
dc.subjectBREEDING
dc.titleInduced pluripotent stem cells from highly endangered species
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleNature Methods
dc.source.volume8
dc.source.issue10
dc.source.beginpage829
dc.source.endpage831
html.description.abstractFor some highly endangered species there are too few reproductively capable animals to maintain adequate genetic diversity, and extraordinary measures are necessary to prevent extinction. We report generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from two endangered species: a primate, the drill, Mandrillus leucophaeus and the nearly extinct northern white rhinoceros, Ceratotherium simum cottoni. iPSCs may eventually facilitate reintroduction of genetic material into breeding populations.


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  • SDZWA Research Publications
    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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