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dc.contributor.authorSchrenzel, Mark D.
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Tammy A.
dc.contributor.authorStalis, Ilse H.
dc.contributor.authorKagan, Rebecca A.
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Russell P.
dc.contributor.authorDenison, Amy M.
dc.contributor.authorDrew, Clifton P.
dc.contributor.authorPaddock, Christopher D.
dc.contributor.authorRideout, Bruce
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-05T20:54:47Z
dc.date.available2021-03-05T20:54:47Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040
dc.identifier.doi10.3201/eid1704.101355
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/898
dc.descriptionPMID: 21470480 PMCID: PMC3377413
dc.description.abstractThe influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus rapidly created a global pandemic among humans and also appears to have strong infectivity for a broad range of animal species (1–3). The virus has been found repeatedly in swine and has been detected in a dog, cats, turkeys, and domestic ferrets and in nondomestic animals, including skunks, cheetahs, and giant anteaters (2–4). In some cases, animal-to-animal transmission may have occurred, raising concern about the development of new wildlife reservoirs. In 2009, the first recognized occurrence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in southern California in April was followed by a surge of cases during October through November (4). During this time, respiratory illness developed in a 12-year-old male American badger (Taxidea taxus taxus), a 19-year-old female Bornean binturong (Arctictis binturong penicillatus), and a 7-year-old black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) housed in a San Diego zoological garden....
dc.description.sponsorship
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3377413/
dc.rightsEmerging Infectious Diseases is an open access journal published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a U.S. Government agency. The journal is a member in good standing of the Directory of Open Access Journals. All materials published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, including text, figures, tables, and photographs, are in the public domain and can be reprinted or used without permission with proper citation.
dc.subjectPANDEMICS
dc.subjectVIROLOGY
dc.subjectDOMESTIC ANIMALS
dc.subjectSKUNKS
dc.subjectCHEETAHS
dc.subjectANTEATERS
dc.subjectPIGS
dc.subjectINFECTION
dc.subjectDISEASES
dc.subjectVETERINARY MEDICINE
dc.subjectIMMUNOLOGY
dc.subjectBINTURONGS
dc.subjectBADGERS
dc.subjectFERRETS
dc.subjectSAN DIEGO ZOO
dc.titlePandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in 3 wildlife species, San Diego, California, USA
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleEmerging Infectious Diseases
dc.source.volume17
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage747
dc.source.endpage749
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-05T21:00:54Z
html.description.abstractThe influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus rapidly created a global pandemic among humans and also appears to have strong infectivity for a broad range of animal species (1–3). The virus has been found repeatedly in swine and has been detected in a dog, cats, turkeys, and domestic ferrets and in nondomestic animals, including skunks, cheetahs, and giant anteaters (2–4). In some cases, animal-to-animal transmission may have occurred, raising concern about the development of new wildlife reservoirs. In 2009, the first recognized occurrence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in southern California in April was followed by a surge of cases during October through November (4). During this time, respiratory illness developed in a 12-year-old male American badger (Taxidea taxus taxus), a 19-year-old female Bornean binturong (Arctictis binturong penicillatus), and a 7-year-old black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) housed in a San Diego zoological garden....


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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