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dc.contributor.authorKorody, Marisa L.
dc.contributor.authorFord, Sarah M.
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Thomas D.
dc.contributor.authorPivaroff, Cullen G.
dc.contributor.authorValiente-Alandi, Iñigo
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Suzanne E.
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorLoring, Jeanne F.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-05T21:37:26Z
dc.date.available2021-03-05T21:37:26Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1547-3287
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/scd.2021.0001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/901
dc.description.abstractExtinction rates are rising, and current conservation technologies may not be adequate for reducing species losses. Future conservation efforts may be aided by the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from highly endangered species. Generation of a set of iPSCs from multiple members of a species can capture some of the dwindling genetic diversity of a disappearing species. We generated iPSCs from fibroblasts cryopreserved in the Frozen Zoo: nine genetically diverse individuals of the functionally extinct northern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) and two from the closely related southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum). We used a non-integrating Sendai virus reprogramming method and developed analyses to confirm the cells’ pluripotency and differentiation potential. This work is the first step of a long-term interdisciplinary plan to apply assisted reproduction techniques to the conservation of this highly endangered species. Advances in iPSC differentiation may enable generation of gametes in vitro from deceased and non-reproductive individuals that could be used to repopulate the species.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/scd.2021.0001
dc.rights© Marisa L. Korody et al. 2021; 1; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are cited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectENDANGERED SPECIES
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectFROZEN ZOO
dc.subjectWHITE RHINOCEROSES
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectEXTINCTION
dc.subjectSTEM CELLS
dc.titleRewinding extinction in the northern white rhinoceros: Genetically diverse induced pluripotent stem cell bank for genetic rescue
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleStem Cells and Development
dc.source.volume30
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage177
dc.source.endpage177
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-05T22:30:46Z
html.description.abstractExtinction rates are rising, and current conservation technologies may not be adequate for reducing species losses. Future conservation efforts may be aided by the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from highly endangered species. Generation of a set of iPSCs from multiple members of a species can capture some of the dwindling genetic diversity of a disappearing species. We generated iPSCs from fibroblasts cryopreserved in the Frozen Zoo: nine genetically diverse individuals of the functionally extinct northern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) and two from the closely related southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum). We used a non-integrating Sendai virus reprogramming method and developed analyses to confirm the cells’ pluripotency and differentiation potential. This work is the first step of a long-term interdisciplinary plan to apply assisted reproduction techniques to the conservation of this highly endangered species. Advances in iPSC differentiation may enable generation of gametes in vitro from deceased and non-reproductive individuals that could be used to repopulate the species.
dc.source.conference


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© Marisa L. Korody et al. 2021; 1; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the
Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Marisa L. Korody et al. 2021; 1; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are cited.