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dc.contributor.authorChock, Rachel Y.
dc.contributor.authorClucas, B.
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, E.K.
dc.contributor.authorBlackwell, B.F.
dc.contributor.authorBlumstein, D.T.
dc.contributor.authorChurch, K.
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Juricic, E.
dc.contributor.authorFrancescoli, G.
dc.contributor.authorGreggor, A.L.
dc.contributor.authorKemp, P.
dc.contributor.authorPinho, G.
dc.contributor.authorSanzenbacher, P.M.
dc.contributor.authorSchulte, B.A.
dc.contributor.authorToni, P.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-05T21:37:27Z
dc.date.available2021-03-05T21:37:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/906
dc.description.abstractUtility-scale solar power is a rapidly expanding renewable energy source with great potential to help meet increasing global energy demands. Solar facilities have large footprints across previously undeveloped habitat, particularly the American Southwest. Despite the scale of this industry, research is scarce on how construction and operation of facilities affect wildlife. We conducted a research-prioritization process to identify key questions to better understand how wildlife is affected by solar facilities and how behavioral data can be used to mitigate negative impacts. Behavioral responses are often the most visible signs of detrimental effects, as behavioral shifts are usually an animal’s first response to environmental change. We asked professionals in the fields of ecology, conservation, and energy to identify important research questions, then held a workshop to reduce and clarify these questions. The priority research areas that emerged included animal perception of solar facilities, movement, habitat use, and interspecific interactions.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://wildlifeprofessional.org/western/tws_abstract_detail.php?abstractID=2733&k=Wkv801R/V0PDw
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS
dc.subjectENERGY
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.titleAssessing potential impacts of solar power facilities on wildlife utilizing animal behavior research
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedings
html.description.abstractUtility-scale solar power is a rapidly expanding renewable energy source with great potential to help meet increasing global energy demands. Solar facilities have large footprints across previously undeveloped habitat, particularly the American Southwest. Despite the scale of this industry, research is scarce on how construction and operation of facilities affect wildlife. We conducted a research-prioritization process to identify key questions to better understand how wildlife is affected by solar facilities and how behavioral data can be used to mitigate negative impacts. Behavioral responses are often the most visible signs of detrimental effects, as behavioral shifts are usually an animal’s first response to environmental change. We asked professionals in the fields of ecology, conservation, and energy to identify important research questions, then held a workshop to reduce and clarify these questions. The priority research areas that emerged included animal perception of solar facilities, movement, habitat use, and interspecific interactions.
dc.source.conferenceConservation in Challenging Times. 68th Annual Meeting of The Wildlife Society Western Section
dc.publisher.locationVirtual


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  • SDZWA Research Publications
    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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