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dc.contributor.authorHorgan, Jane E.
dc.contributor.authorVan der Weyde, Leanne K.
dc.contributor.authorComley, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorParker, Dan M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-05T21:37:28Z
dc.date.available2021-03-05T21:37:28Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2694-7684
dc.identifier.doi10.25225/jvb.20104
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/913
dc.description.abstractLivestock guarding dogs (LGDs) have been used for centuries to reduce depredation on livestock and, more recently, to facilitate the conservation of threatened carnivores. Conservation organisations in southern Africa promote the use of Anatolian shepherds as LGDs. However, livestock farmers in Botswana use a variety of breeds for this purpose, including local landrace “Tswana” dogs. Our study sought to test the overall effectiveness of these local breeds as LGDs. Irrespective of breed, all LGDs reduced livestock losses, with 47.9% of farmers experiencing no losses after obtaining a guarding dog. Owners with more LGDs, and LGDs of a single sex, had greater reductions in livestock losses. Anatolian shepherds displayed more behavioural problems than other breeds in our study. The health of LGDs was reliant on them receiving a balanced diet, and owners with fewer dogs reported fewer health issues. Moreover, Tswana guarding dogs were cheaper to purchase and feed than their purebred counterparts. Our results show that local landrace dogs can be considered a cheaper and more practical alternative to purebred LGDs for reducing livestock losses and for mitigating human-wildlife conflict in Botswana.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://bioone.org/journals/journal-of-vertebrate-biology/volume-69/issue-3/jvb.20104/Every-dog-has-its-day--indigenous-Tswana-dogs-are/10.25225/jvb.20104.full
dc.rightsCC BY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
dc.subjectSOUTHERN AFRICA
dc.subjectLIVESTOCK
dc.subjectDOGS
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectHUSBANDRY
dc.titleEvery dog has its day: indigenous Tswana dogs are more practical livestock guardians in an arid African savanna compared with their expatriate cousins
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Vertebrate Biology
dc.source.volume69
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage20104.1-16
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-05T22:35:57Z
html.description.abstractLivestock guarding dogs (LGDs) have been used for centuries to reduce depredation on livestock and, more recently, to facilitate the conservation of threatened carnivores. Conservation organisations in southern Africa promote the use of Anatolian shepherds as LGDs. However, livestock farmers in Botswana use a variety of breeds for this purpose, including local landrace “Tswana” dogs. Our study sought to test the overall effectiveness of these local breeds as LGDs. Irrespective of breed, all LGDs reduced livestock losses, with 47.9% of farmers experiencing no losses after obtaining a guarding dog. Owners with more LGDs, and LGDs of a single sex, had greater reductions in livestock losses. Anatolian shepherds displayed more behavioural problems than other breeds in our study. The health of LGDs was reliant on them receiving a balanced diet, and owners with fewer dogs reported fewer health issues. Moreover, Tswana guarding dogs were cheaper to purchase and feed than their purebred counterparts. Our results show that local landrace dogs can be considered a cheaper and more practical alternative to purebred LGDs for reducing livestock losses and for mitigating human-wildlife conflict in Botswana.
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