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dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Susan J.
dc.contributor.authorCastro, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Murray A.
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-17T20:35:56Z
dc.date.available2021-03-17T20:35:56Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn09088857, 1600048X
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-048X.2010.05138.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/915
dc.description.abstractBirds that forage by probing must often rely on sensory systems other than vision to detect their buried prey. Such senses may include hearing (e.g. Australian magpies (Atramidae), American robins (Turdidae)) or chemical senses/olfaction (e.g. kiwi (Apterygidae) and some shorebirds (Scolopacidae)). Probe foraging kiwi and shorebirds are also able to use vibrotactile cues to locate prey buried in the substrate at some distance from their bill‐tips (‘remote touch’). These birds possess an organ consisting of a honey‐comb of sensory pits in bone of the bill‐tips, packed with mechanoreceptive nerve ending (Herbst corpuscles). Such a bill‐tip organ has recently also been described in ibises (Threskiornithinae), but its function not elucidated. We designed a foraging experiment presenting mealworm prey to three captive Madagascar crested ibises Lophotibis cristata urschi under a variety of trial conditions to discover whether they were using remote touch, mediated by their bill‐tip organ; chemosense/olfaction; or hearing to locate buried prey. The ibises were reliant on remote touch for prey detection – the first time this sensory system has been demonstrated for this group of birds. They did not appear to use hearing or chemical senses/olfaction to aid in prey detection.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1600-048X.2010.05138.x
dc.rights© 2010 The Authors
dc.subjectBIRDS
dc.subjectSENSE ORGANS
dc.subjectVISION
dc.subjectHEARING
dc.subjectOLFACTION
dc.subjectKIWIS
dc.subjectROBINS
dc.subjectIBISES
dc.subjectCHARADRIIFORMES
dc.subjectAPTERYGIFORMES
dc.subjectFORAGING
dc.subjectINTEGUMENT
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectPREY
dc.titleRemote touch prey-detection by Madagascar crested ibises Lophotibis cristata urschi
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Avian Biology
dc.source.volume41
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage350
dc.source.endpage353
html.description.abstractBirds that forage by probing must often rely on sensory systems other than vision to detect their buried prey. Such senses may include hearing (e.g. Australian magpies (Atramidae), American robins (Turdidae)) or chemical senses/olfaction (e.g. kiwi (Apterygidae) and some shorebirds (Scolopacidae)). Probe foraging kiwi and shorebirds are also able to use vibrotactile cues to locate prey buried in the substrate at some distance from their bill‐tips (‘remote touch’). These birds possess an organ consisting of a honey‐comb of sensory pits in bone of the bill‐tips, packed with mechanoreceptive nerve ending (Herbst corpuscles). Such a bill‐tip organ has recently also been described in ibises (Threskiornithinae), but its function not elucidated. We designed a foraging experiment presenting mealworm prey to three captive Madagascar crested ibises Lophotibis cristata urschi under a variety of trial conditions to discover whether they were using remote touch, mediated by their bill‐tip organ; chemosense/olfaction; or hearing to locate buried prey. The ibises were reliant on remote touch for prey detection – the first time this sensory system has been demonstrated for this group of birds. They did not appear to use hearing or chemical senses/olfaction to aid in prey detection.


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