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dc.contributor.authorEllstrand, Norman C.
dc.contributor.authorBiggs, David
dc.contributor.authorKaus, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorLubinsky, Pesach
dc.contributor.authorMcDade, Lucinda A.
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Kristine
dc.contributor.authorPrince, Linda M.
dc.contributor.authorRegan, Helen M.
dc.contributor.authorRorive, Veronique
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorSchierenbeck, Kristina A.
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-17T20:35:57Z
dc.date.available2021-03-17T20:35:57Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn1525-3244, 0006-3568
dc.identifier.doi10.1525/bio.2010.60.5.8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/918
dc.description.abstract...Developing sound science-based conservation policy that addresses hybridization requires cross-disciplinary social-science and life-science research to address the following two questions: (1) How do human decisions with regard to species protection, trade, transportation, land use, and other factors affect the opportunities for, and rates of hybridization between, rare species and more common relatives? and (2) How do the positive or negative perceived values regarding hybrids and hybrid-derived individuals compare with values regarding their nonhybridized counterparts from social, cultural, economic, and environmental perspectives...?
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article-lookup/doi/10.1525/bio.2010.60.5.8
dc.rightsCopyright © 2010 by American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE TRADE
dc.subjectHABITATS
dc.subjectECOSYSTEMS
dc.subjectHYBRIDIZATION
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES
dc.titleGot hybridization? A multidisciplinary approach for informing science policy
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBioScience
dc.source.volume60
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage384
dc.source.endpage388
html.description.abstract...Developing sound science-based conservation policy that addresses hybridization requires cross-disciplinary social-science and life-science research to address the following two questions: (1) How do human decisions with regard to species protection, trade, transportation, land use, and other factors affect the opportunities for, and rates of hybridization between, rare species and more common relatives? and (2) How do the positive or negative perceived values regarding hybrids and hybrid-derived individuals compare with values regarding their nonhybridized counterparts from social, cultural, economic, and environmental perspectives...?


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  • SDZWA Research Publications
    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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