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dc.contributor.authorHarlow, Henry J.
dc.contributor.authorPurwandana, Deni
dc.contributor.authorJessop, Tim S.
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, John A.
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-17T20:35:58Z
dc.date.available2021-03-17T20:35:58Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn1687-8477, 1687-8485
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2010/921371
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/924
dc.description.abstractThermoregulatory processes were compared among three-size groups of free-ranging Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) comprising small (5–20 kg), medium (20–40 gm) and large (40–70 kg) lizards. While all size groups maintained a similar preferred body temperature of 35, they achieved this end point differently. Small dragons appeared to engage in sun shuttling behavior more vigorously than large dragons as represented by their greater frequency of daily ambient temperature and light intensity changes as well as a greater activity and overall exposure to the sun. Large dragons were more sedentary and sun shuttled less. Further, they appear to rely to a greater extent on microhabitat selection and employed mouth gaping evaporative cooling to maintain their preferred operational temperature and prevent overheating. A potential ecological consequence of size-specific thermoregulatory habits for dragons is separation of foraging areas. In part, differences in thermoregulation could contribute to inducing shifts in predatory strategies from active foraging in small dragons to more sedentary sit-and-wait ambush predators in adults.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijz/2010/921371/
dc.rightsCopyright © 2010 Henry J. Harlow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectKOMODO DRAGONS
dc.subjectTHERMOREGULATION
dc.subjectTEMPERATURE
dc.subjectLIGHT
dc.subjectHABITATS
dc.subjectFORAGING
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.titleSize-related differences in the thermoregulatory habits of free-ranging Komodo dragons.
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Journal of Zoology
dc.source.volume2010
dc.source.issueArticle ID 921371
dc.source.numberofpages9
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-17T20:58:20Z
html.description.abstractThermoregulatory processes were compared among three-size groups of free-ranging Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) comprising small (5–20 kg), medium (20–40 gm) and large (40–70 kg) lizards. While all size groups maintained a similar preferred body temperature of 35, they achieved this end point differently. Small dragons appeared to engage in sun shuttling behavior more vigorously than large dragons as represented by their greater frequency of daily ambient temperature and light intensity changes as well as a greater activity and overall exposure to the sun. Large dragons were more sedentary and sun shuttled less. Further, they appear to rely to a greater extent on microhabitat selection and employed mouth gaping evaporative cooling to maintain their preferred operational temperature and prevent overheating. A potential ecological consequence of size-specific thermoregulatory habits for dragons is separation of foraging areas. In part, differences in thermoregulation could contribute to inducing shifts in predatory strategies from active foraging in small dragons to more sedentary sit-and-wait ambush predators in adults.


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Copyright © 2010 Henry J. Harlow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2010 Henry J. Harlow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.