Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWalston, Joe
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, John G.
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Elizabeth L.
dc.contributor.authorBreitenmoser, Urs
dc.contributor.authorFonseca, Gustavo A. B. da
dc.contributor.authorGoodrich, John
dc.contributor.authorGumal, Melvin
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Luke
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Arlyne
dc.contributor.authorKaranth, K. Ullas
dc.contributor.authorLeader-Williams, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorMacKinnon, Kathy
dc.contributor.authorMiquelle, Dale
dc.contributor.authorPattanavibool, Anak
dc.contributor.authorPoole, Colin
dc.contributor.authorRabinowitz, Alan
dc.contributor.authorSmith, James L. D.
dc.contributor.authorStokes, Emma J.
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Simon N.
dc.contributor.authorVongkhamheng, Chanthavy
dc.contributor.authorWibisono, Hariyo
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-17T20:35:59Z
dc.date.available2021-03-17T20:35:59Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn1545-7885
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pbio.1000485
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/944
dc.description.abstract...Wild tiger numbers are at an historic low. There is no evidence of breeding populations of tigers in Cambodia, China, Vietnam, and DPR Korea. Current approaches to tiger conservation are not slowing the decline in tiger numbers [1]–[3], which has continued unabated over the last two decades. While the scale of the challenge is enormous, we submit that the complexity of effective implementation is not: commitments should shift to focus on protecting tigers at spatially well-defined priority sites, supported by proven best practices of law enforcement, wildlife management, and scientific monitoring. Conflict with local people needs to be mitigated. We argue that such a shift in emphasis would reverse the decline of wild tigers and do so in a rapid and cost-efficient manner....
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1000485
dc.rights© 2010 Walston et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
dc.subjectINDIA
dc.subjectASIA
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectTIGERS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectCHINA
dc.subjectCAMBODIA
dc.subjectVIETNAM
dc.subjectKOREA
dc.subjectPOPULATIONS
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectTRACKING
dc.subjectANIMAL-HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
dc.subjectCONSERVATION LAWS
dc.subjectREGULATIONS
dc.titleBringing the Tiger Back from the Brink—The Six Percent Solution
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitlePLOS Biology
dc.source.volume8
dc.source.issue9
dc.source.beginpagee1000485
html.description.abstract...Wild tiger numbers are at an historic low. There is no evidence of breeding populations of tigers in Cambodia, China, Vietnam, and DPR Korea. Current approaches to tiger conservation are not slowing the decline in tiger numbers [1]–[3], which has continued unabated over the last two decades. While the scale of the challenge is enormous, we submit that the complexity of effective implementation is not: commitments should shift to focus on protecting tigers at spatially well-defined priority sites, supported by proven best practices of law enforcement, wildlife management, and scientific monitoring. Conflict with local people needs to be mitigated. We argue that such a shift in emphasis would reverse the decline of wild tigers and do so in a rapid and cost-efficient manner....


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • SDZWA Research Publications
    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

Show simple item record

© 2010 Walston et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2010 Walston et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.