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dc.contributor.authorChock, Rachel Y.
dc.contributor.authorClucas, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Elizabeth K.
dc.contributor.authorBlackwell, Bradley F.
dc.contributor.authorBlumstein, Daniel T.
dc.contributor.authorChurch, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Juricic, Esteban
dc.contributor.authorFrancescoli, Gabriel
dc.contributor.authorGreggor, Alison L.
dc.contributor.authorKemp, Paul
dc.contributor.authorPinho, Gabriela M.
dc.contributor.authorSanzenbacher, Peter M.
dc.contributor.authorSchulte, Bruce A.
dc.contributor.authorToni, Pauline
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-19T17:31:20Z
dc.date.available2021-03-19T17:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2578-4854
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/csp2.319
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/948
dc.description.abstractSolar power is a renewable energy source with great potential to help meet increasing global energy demands and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. However, research is scarce on how solar facilities affect wildlife. With input from professionals in ecology, conservation, and energy, we conducted a research-prioritization process and identified key questions needed to better understand impacts of solar facilities on wildlife. We focused on animal behavior, which can be used to identify population responses before mortality or other fitness consequences are documented. Behavioral studies can also offer approaches to understand the mechanisms leading to negative interactions (e.g., collision, singeing, avoidance) and provide insight into mitigating effects. Here, we review how behavioral responses to solar facilities, including perception, movement, habitat use, and interspecific interactions are priority research areas. Addressing these themes will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of solar power on wildlife and guide future mitigation.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/csp2.319
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectWILDLIFE CONSERVATION
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectENERGY
dc.subjectECOLOGY
dc.subjectFITNESS
dc.subjectDEATH
dc.subjectHABITATS
dc.subjectINJURIES
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.titleEvaluating potential effects of solar power facilities on wildlife from an animal behavior perspective
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleConservation Science and Practice
dc.source.volume3
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpagee319
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-19T17:47:46Z
html.description.abstractSolar power is a renewable energy source with great potential to help meet increasing global energy demands and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. However, research is scarce on how solar facilities affect wildlife. With input from professionals in ecology, conservation, and energy, we conducted a research-prioritization process and identified key questions needed to better understand impacts of solar facilities on wildlife. We focused on animal behavior, which can be used to identify population responses before mortality or other fitness consequences are documented. Behavioral studies can also offer approaches to understand the mechanisms leading to negative interactions (e.g., collision, singeing, avoidance) and provide insight into mitigating effects. Here, we review how behavioral responses to solar facilities, including perception, movement, habitat use, and interspecific interactions are priority research areas. Addressing these themes will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of solar power on wildlife and guide future mitigation.
dc.source.conference


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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© 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 The Authors. Conservation Science and Practice published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology