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dc.contributor.authorBarocas, Adi
dc.contributor.authorGolden, Howard N
dc.contributor.authorDudenhoeffer, Megan
dc.contributor.authorBen-David, Merav
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-19T17:31:20Z
dc.date.available2021-03-19T17:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1045-2249
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/beheco/araa102
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/949
dc.descriptionSeveral carnivores use latrine sites for olfactory signaling. River otters exhibit a flexible social system of mostly males that communicate through scent marking at latrines. We tested the hypotheses that such signaling behavior is influenced by social structure and local information on the presence of conspecifics. Camera footage suggested that solitary otters were more likely to perform both sniffing and scent marking, compared with otters in groups. Signalers were more likely to scent mark when in smaller groups, at highly active latrines. When in groups, scent-marking frequency increased when other individuals were signaling, suggesting a positive feedback. Our results suggest that in river otters, scent-marking decisions minimize signal dilution by being performed in small groups and maximize the receivers through signaling at latrines with higher, more recent activity. Because signaling decisions are linked to key life-history events such as mating and group shifts, understanding their behavioral drivers can be crucial.
dc.description.abstract…In concert, our results suggest that in river otters, scent-marking decisions minimize signal dilution by being performed in small groups and maximize the receivers through preferential signaling at latrines with higher, more recent activity. Because signaling decisions in social animals are linked to key life-history events such as mating and group membership shifts, understanding their individual and population-level drivers can be crucial.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/araa102
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved. F
dc.rights.uri© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved. F
dc.subjectOTTERS
dc.subjectOLFACTION
dc.subjectCOMMUNICATION
dc.subjectSCENT MARKING
dc.subjectMATING
dc.subjectSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
dc.subjectCARNIVORES
dc.subjectCAMERA TRAPS
dc.titleSociality and signaling activity modulate information flow in river otter communication networks
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioral Ecology
dc.source.volume32
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage60
dc.source.endpage68
html.description.abstract…In concert, our results suggest that in river otters, scent-marking decisions minimize signal dilution by being performed in small groups and maximize the receivers through preferential signaling at latrines with higher, more recent activity. Because signaling decisions in social animals are linked to key life-history events such as mating and group membership shifts, understanding their individual and population-level drivers can be crucial.
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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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