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dc.contributor.authorWright, Belinda R.
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Carolyn J.
dc.contributor.authorMcLennan, Elspeth A.
dc.contributor.authorBelov, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorGrueber, Catherine E.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-19T17:31:20Z
dc.date.available2021-03-19T17:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1572-9710
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10531-021-02128-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/950
dc.description.abstract…We have quantified the effects of selection, drift and gene flow in 503 individuals across five generations from the Tasmanian devil insurance population. To determine whether different processes were acting in different settings, we separately analysed animals housed under individual-based management, versus those that were released to an island site. We found that a greater proportion of alleles were lost over time in the smaller island population than in captivity and propose that genetic drift is the most likely process influencing this result….
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-021-02128-4
dc.rights© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. part of Springer Nature 2021
dc.subjectTASMANIAN DEVILS
dc.subjectWILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectPOPULATIONS
dc.subjectGENOMICS
dc.subjectHUSBANDRY
dc.subjectEVOLUTION
dc.titleAssessing evolutionary processes over time in a conservation breeding program: A combined approach using molecular data, simulations and pedigree analysis
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBiodiversity and Conservation
dc.source.volume30
dc.source.beginpage1011
dc.source.endpage1029
html.description.abstract…We have quantified the effects of selection, drift and gene flow in 503 individuals across five generations from the Tasmanian devil insurance population. To determine whether different processes were acting in different settings, we separately analysed animals housed under individual-based management, versus those that were released to an island site. We found that a greater proportion of alleles were lost over time in the smaller island population than in captivity and propose that genetic drift is the most likely process influencing this result….
dc.source.conference


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    Peer reviewed and scientific works by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance staff. Includes books, book sections, articles and conference publications and presentations.

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