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dc.contributor.authorWatkins, Paul A.
dc.contributor.authorMoser, Ann B.
dc.contributor.authorToomer, Cicely B.
dc.contributor.authorSteinberg, Steven J.
dc.contributor.authorMoser, Hugo W.
dc.contributor.authorKaraman, Mazen W.
dc.contributor.authorRamaswamy, Krishna
dc.contributor.authorSiegmund, Kimberly D.
dc.contributor.authorLee, D. Rick
dc.contributor.authorEly, John J.
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Oliver A.
dc.contributor.authorHacia, Joseph G.
dc.contributor.editor
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-26T23:36:37Z
dc.date.available2021-03-26T23:36:37Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn1472-6793
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6793-10-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12634/978
dc.description.abstractIt has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6793-10-19
dc.rights© 2010 Watkins et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.subjectBONOBOS
dc.subjectCHIMPANZEES
dc.subjectGORILLAS
dc.subjectORANGUTANS
dc.subjectDIETS
dc.subjectRESEARCH
dc.subjectHEALTH
dc.subjectHUMANS
dc.subjectDIETS IN MANAGED CARE
dc.titleIdentification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleBMC Physiology
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage10
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-26T23:39:19Z
html.description.abstractIt has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism.


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© 2010 Watkins et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2010 Watkins et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.